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Dental appointment looming and I'm feeling anxious. Advice please? ?

Tagged as: Health, Trust issues<< Previous question   Next question >>
Question - (31 March 2016) 10 Answers - (Newest, 1 April 2016)
A female United Kingdom age 36-40, *londe30s writes:

hi, i need some advice as i do suffer with anxiety and i worry a lot.

i had a chipped tooth i had something hard, anyway i went to the dentist and had a filling but a week later that filling had cracked its coming away.

im going back today i am really worried though as dont know why my filling didnt last the first time as i didnt eat on it i still eat the other side and having soft foods.

im only 36 and the dentist did say i had healthy teeth. im worried what they will do today or if it will happen again.

i have had fillings done in the past on other teeth and they all been fine.

any advice is there a dentist maybe out there that has advice too? thank you.

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A female reader, blonde30s United Kingdom +, writes (1 April 2016):

blonde30s is verified as being by the original poster of the question

blonde30s agony auntThanks everyone so greatful to you all.

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A female reader, anonymous, writes (1 April 2016):

I see you're in the UK. I went private as no nhs dentist could sensitively handle my anxiety over treatment and they can't provide aesthetically pleasing results either (metal fillings!). It's more expensive but you get what you pay for, I have white fillings which don't show at all and when I needed a wisdom tooth out I was sedated intravenously which they wouldn't have done for me on the nhs in the dental practice - I would've been sent to a hospital treatment centre place.

It's worked our cheaper signing up to a monthly insurance plan where all my check ups, hygienist appointments, x rays and emergency call outs are included. Nhs dentists really are limited by what they can offer so pulling a tooth out is often the easiest option. If you can afford to pay of a treatment monthly it's definitely worth it.

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A female reader, blonde30s United Kingdom +, writes (1 April 2016):

blonde30s is verified as being by the original poster of the question

blonde30s agony auntI got appointment with a private dentist 14th April with my mum's dentist she's had for years and he is really good. My nan had him too.

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A female reader, CindyCares Italy + , writes (1 April 2016):

CindyCares agony aunt Sure, asking a second opinion may be a good idea. Particularly if you are not convinced that your dentist did the best possible job the first time ( if the infection is so serious that the tooth needs to be pulled out, probably it was already there at the time of your first filling- how come it went undetected ? )

Anyway, just for the record, yes , it is possible to have a dental infection with no pain. Not very common, yet possible.

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A male reader, anonymous, writes (1 April 2016):

Sorry to hear that you're still not sorted out.

Even if you've got an infection, it wouldn't necessarily hurt. If the tooth is infected then there are essentially two options, either remove the whole tooth or remove the nerve from the tooth (root canal).

If you're not convinced by the diagnosis, by all means seek a second opinion. You are allowed to ask for a copy of your records (including X-rays) and the dentist must give it to you. In the UK they are allowed to charge for duplicating the records (£10 for written records and up to £50 for X-rays, I think), but most practices won't bother with this.

I would recommend doing this pretty quickly though, as although your tooth doesn't hurt now, it could start to give problems at any point (if it is infected).

Good luck getting this sorted out.

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A female reader, blonde30s United Kingdom +, writes (1 April 2016):

blonde30s is verified as being by the original poster of the question

blonde30s agony auntHi everyone thank you for advice. My dentist said I have infection and need the tooth out but I am in no pain at all with the tooth. People have said to me if I'm not in pain why is he saying to have it out. What do I do? I want to try a different dentist to see what they say too.

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A female reader, Anonymous 123 Italy + , writes (1 April 2016):

Anonymous 123 agony auntMaybe he gave you a temporary filling?

It happened with me once. I went to the dentist when i was in absolute hell and I had to travel the next day and I didn't have the time for all the sessions that were required, so my dentist gave me a temporary filling and asked me to come back within a month so that he could do the permanent thing.

Don't worry, just ask your dentist. It'll be fine, trust me.

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A female reader, aunt honesty Ireland + , writes (31 March 2016):

aunt honesty agony auntThis is a question for your dentist, as well we could have a guessing game on here about what happened. As you said yourself you don't feel that the problem was on your part, so tell the dentist that and ask him what he feels may have caused it to come off. Maybe it was just not set properly or maybe he just did not make it secure enough around your tooth. Am hoping he will reassure you everything will be okay this time.

Have you thought about getting help for your anxiety problem? You don't need to suffer this, there is help out there for people with anxiety and who worry about everything. I suggest talking to your doctor or a therapist about treatment. Good luck.

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A male reader, anonymous, writes (31 March 2016):

Hopefully by now you've had the work done and everything is sorted, but I'll add my bit.

There are a huge number of reasons why a filling may fail and it's pointless to speculate too much. It may have been that the bite was wrong (high), the dentist couldn't keep your tooth dry while it was being filled, or simply that they tried to do a minimal patch to avoid doing too much to a nervous patient.

If it was done under the NHS, it is guaranteed for the first twelve months and replacement should be free, if the same type of restoration is used again. If it needs something like a crown, you may have to pay again. If you paid privately, it's down to the dentist themselves to decide if their work is guaranteed, some do and some don't.

The best plan is to talk to your dentist and ask them why this has happened. Ask what can be done to prevent it failing again and explain how anxious you are. In most cases your dentist should be happy to answer any questions that you have (though during the Easter holiday we can be a bit pushed for time!).

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A female reader, CindyCares Italy + , writes (31 March 2016):

CindyCares agony aunt This is a good question ...for your dentist. " My filling came off after just one week- why ? " . Your dentist is supposed to have an explanation for a work that lasted much less than it should have , and as a paying client you are entitled to know it.

Anyway, FWIW as an answer from a non-dentist, just a dental patient, fillings come off for two reasons :

- a botched , improperly executed job ( It happens. Dentists too make mistakes ).

- an infiltration of caries beneath it, or around its marges, which takes away support to the filling itself and makes it unstable.

Neither is a big problem, except perhaps for your wallet :), and can be fixed easily and rapidly. ( have all the old filling removed , though. Do not have it just " patched UP " with a partial new filling because that would be a very temporary solution ).

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